Radio Pages

Japan Radio Company Ltd., Tokyo

JRC Logo
travel radios
portable receivers
communication receivers
oldie - receivers
"boatanchors"
military equipment
 
AOR
Drake
Grundig
Icom
Japanese Receivers
JRC
Kenwood
Lowe
Panasonic
Philips
Realistic DX / Tandy
RFT / VEB Köpenick
Siemens
Sony
Yaesu
 
JRC
NRD - 1107
NRD - 505
NRD - 515
NRD - 525
NRD - 535
NRD - 545
NRD - 345
 
shortwave reception
RTTY decoding
 
receiver list
receiver manuals
 
links
varia / copyright
about / contact

überarbeitet am 19.10.2010

Japan Radio Company already had got a very good reputation for their professional maritime communications equipment when they entered the amateur radio market 1977 with a perfectly designed line of (semi)professional technology receivers in an acceptable price range.
In the middle of the sixties, Japan Radio Company presented the NRD-1, and a slightly downgraded twin, the NRD-2, two hollow state receivers with analog linear dials, the NRD-10 series presented 1974 was transistorized and featured a digital frequency display.
In parallel to the commercial double conversion receivers of the NRD-71 series, the NRD-505 made it's appearence in 1977, this was the first of JRC's receivers designed for the amateurradio market - it's price tag of 2250 US$ was a challenge for the majority of the shortwave listeners. This receiver as well as it's very popular successor NRD-515 could be operated connected with a matching transmitter. There have bben quite expensive external memory options and an external frequency input keypad, the later NRD-525 appearing in 1986 had some 200 memories and the frequency keypad already integrated. Because of it's competitive price, it became a very popular set in Switzerland and I got used to find features like passband tuning, notch fiter and a choice of IF bandwidths on a desktop receiver.
After the NRD-535, JRC presented it's first receiver using digital signal processing (DSP) in 1998, the NRD-545.
The budget NRD-345 as entry to JRC gear was introduced in 1997, on the other side of theprice range, the professional NRD-301A/302A receivers are not affordable for most hobbyists.

Desktop Receivers

NRD-1: triple conversion, 90 kHz - 30 MHz, linear analog dial
NRD-10: triple conversion, 100 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, 16 memories, solid state  
NRD-1107 (1977): double conversion, 1,6 - 25 MHz maritime bands, digital frequency display, tuning with decadic knobs, AM, CW, SSB
NRD-71: double conversion, 100 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, memory option  
NRD-93: double conversion, 90 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, 60 memories  
NRD-301A: double conversion, 90 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, 300 memories, no keypad
NRD-505 (1977): double conversion, 100 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, optional 4 memories, passender Sender NSD-500
NRD-515: double conversion, 100 kHz - 34 MHz, digital frequency display, PBT, optional 24 / 96 memories, external frequency keypad optional matching transmitter NSD-515
NRD-525 (1996): double conversion, 90 kHz - 34 MHz, digital frequency display, 200 memories, PBT, noise blanker, optional computer control board & RTTY decoder
NRD-535 (1991): triple conversion, 100 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, 200 memories, PBT, noise blanker, ECSS, computer interface, optional RTTY decoder
NRD-545: triple conversion, 100 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, 1000 memories, PBT, DSP, ECSS, computer interface, integrated RTTY decoder
NRD-345: double conversion, 100 kHz - 30 MHz, digital frequency display, 100 memories, Noise Blanker, synchroneous detection, computer interface